Splinter Meeting DataManage

Data-intensive Radio Astronomy: Challenges and Opportunities in Science and Data Management

Time: Tuesday September 10, 14:00-16:30 and Thursday September 12, 14:00-15:45 and 16:15-18:00 CEST (UTC+2)

Room: S22

Convenor(s): Holger Stiele [1], Robert Beswick [2], Claudia Comito [1], Matthias Hoeft [3], Cristina Manzano [1], Tim-Eric Rathjen [4], Eleni Vardoulaki [3]
[1] Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ), [2] UK SKA Regional Centre & e-MERLIN/VLBI Nat. Facility / The University of Manchester, [3] Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg (TLS), [4] University of Cologne

Current radio telescopes (e.g. LOFAR, MeerKAT, ASKAP, MWA, HERA, e-MERLIN, CHIME) have demonstrated the difficulties of obtaining hundreds of Gbits/sec of data and processing them through pipelines in order to produce scientifically usable products. Providing the community with efficient methods for accessing and processing these data and efficient data storage for archiving is a formidable challenge. With the next generation of all-sky surveys such as planned with SKAO already around the corner, the boundaries of astronomical datasets will be pushed to exa-scale. While much of the knowledge gained from the analysis of current datasets can be applied to future surveys, the community will face particular challenges regarding processing and storage of the data, as well as the extraction of useful scientific data products at such data scales. Many initiatives on national, European and international levels (e.g. AENEAS, ESCAPE, RadioNet, ORP, RadioBlocks, B3D) seek to address these issues through collaboration between astronomers and data scientists. The meeting will provide a platform to present and discuss current approaches to the challenges outlined above. Tools that have been developed, as well as ideas for future data processing and storage, may thus be made available to the scientific community. Another aim of the meeting is to offer a forum to present and discuss the cutting edge science that can be done with the large data sets obtained with current and future instruments. Contributions are invited from computer science and from all areas of radio astronomy: cosmology, large scale structures, continuum maps, HI and spectral line surveys, polarisation, and transient phenomena such as pulsars and fast radio bursts. In this framework we also welcome contributions related to machine learning approaches to obtain data products in all of these fields. The final goal of the meeting is to discuss ongoing and future challenges and approaches in the field of data-intensive radio astronomy, as well as to foster and consolidate collaborations within the scientific community to address those.

Program

Tuesday September 10, 14:00-16:30 Data-intensive Radio Astronomy: Challenges and Opportunities in Science and Data Management (S22)

Thursday September 12, 14:00-15:45 Data-intensive Radio Astronomy: Challenges and Opportunities in Science and Data Management (S22)

Thursday September 12, 16:15-18:00 Data-intensive Radio Astronomy: Challenges and Opportunities in Science and Data Management (S22)

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